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20130228
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
, for the last of those years, country director for morocco and tunisia. earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work which we will see john out, up in northern mali. very delighted to have him on our team at the africa center, as well as as a friend. also delighted to have another ,ld friend, dr. ricardo renÉ dr. of science at binghamton university on islam. he has been a colleague, i might mention that he and i are editing a book together on the north african revolutions. delighted to have him as a scholar of the region and a friend and our wives have become friends as well. it is in the family, so to speak. last but not least, this dr. is a political scientist and senior fellow at the middle east program of the carnegie endowment. and author of quite a number of works, some quite prescient in their timing on al qaeda. you have their biographical notes for fuller details. one thing not in the notes, i cannot resist mentioning that while there are few discussions of the crisis in mali going around washington, this will be the only one where the panel speakers includes individuals who have b
. america finding itself on the sidelines. we are on the sidelines in egypt, tunisia, libya. we cannot pick who is going to be the winner. we can be there with help, with aid, should be there more. we could help with education and the things that america does best. to try and trick the metal is as if we can pick the winners and put them at the top, -- middle east as if we can pick the winners and put them at the top will be a disservice of america. we will not get the people we want on top. that is what we are seeing today. people that have not been close to america. they will find a way to build it that her society for themselves. america cannot choose george washington for somebody else. the syrians will have to find their own george washington. that will come out of this maelstrom of national revolution. they will find their leader that will lead them towards a better future and hopefully a democratic future. >> five sentences. >> i am not sure how to conclude. for the last 20 years, we have been not succeeding in warmaking or peacemaking in this region. the frame of reference is that --
as a difficult, the evolving situation in north africa, now with tunisia, with libya, with all these countries, and certainly with mali, and how you plan to direct the agency to deal with this devolving momentum that is taking place in northern africa. so that will be for tuesday, and at the request of senator levin, i ask for unanimous consent to add into the record a joint statement that he and i made on april 27, 2012, and, secondly, in order to have mr. brennan's answers to questions for the record by the time he returns before us in closed session, i ask members provide questions for the record by 5:00 p.m. tomorrow. that is friday, february 8, so we have them for you as soon as possible. i want to thank you and your family for being here and i wish you well. and you and the hearing is adjourned. >> thank you, chairwoman. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> on c-span today, "washington journal" is next live with your phone calls. later, live coverage of the farewell ceremony for out coming -- outgoing defense
democracies across the world from libya, tunisia, and beyond. it is in our mutual interest. i want to thank the president for the important leadership. showing the support for libya. i think he and the people of the united kingdom can be proud. william and i agreed that the syrian people deserve better than the horrific violence that threatens the everyday lives of innocent people, people wanting their government to be accountable and part of their own lives. the regime has rained down rockets, and that is just the latest example of brutality. we condemn this indiscriminate killing of innocent civilians and we condemn it in the strongest terms. it is just further evidence assad has to go. i think william for the effort to help dial up the pressure on the regime, for their contributions of humanitarian aid and hosting the transition conference last month. let me make clear that we will continue to work closely with british allies to address the growing humanitarian crisis and the support of the syrian opposition council. we are coordinating with the syrian opposition coalition, coordinating
future attacks being planned by the same people because we never got a chance to talk to him. tunisia said their laws would not let them hold him. that is an excuse we've heard in other pats of the world. that doesn't concern you? >> we press our partners in foreign government to hold individuals and to allow us access to it. sometimes their laws do not allow that to happen. i think the united states government has to respect these governments right to, in fact, enforce their laws appropriately. we don't want to have these individuals being held in some kind of custody that is extra judicial. >> thank you. >> senator warner. >> thank you. thank you mr. brennan, for your testimony today. i think what we've heard from a number of colleagues and we had this discussion when we discussed the committee study. how could be confirmed -- i'm-- how do you ensure that the c.i.a. director is going to be well-informed. particularly to -- we have questioned you about a number of key sensitive programs. the agency is in a lot of these programs that there needs to be some ability to measure objective
they did. he is still in tunisia. it shows the two nations are working with the rule of law, just like we do. >> we have someone who is a suspect in the potential attack on benghazi and did not give us access to him, and we don't have any information. >> we work with our partners across the board. when they can detain individuals according to their laws, we were to see if we have the ability to ask some questions, sometimes directly and sometimes indirectly. >> but the tunisian law did not allow them to hold them so they let them go? >> and we did not have anything on him, either. if we did, we would have made the point for them to turn them over to us. the cia should be able to lend its full expertise as it does right now in terms of and support a military interrogations', fbi, and foreign partner of the briefings. they do that on a regular basis. >> what is the best setting? a suspected terrorist is captured and we think we can obtain information from them, where the suggest they be taken? what is the right setting? >> there are many options. sometimes with foreign partners, they put th
in detail to what i perceive as a difficult, the evolving situation in north africa, now with tunisia, with libya, with all these countries, and certainly with mali, and how you plan to direct the agency to deal with this devolving momentum that is taking place in northern africa. so that will be for tuesday, and at the request of senator levin, i ask unanimous consent to add into the record a joint statement that he and i may, on april 27, 2012, and, secondly, in order to have mr. brennan's answers to questions for the record by the time he returns before us in closed session, i ask members to the right questions for the record by 5:00 p.m. tomorrow. that is friday, february 8, so we have them for you as soon as we i want to thank you and your family for being here. i wish you well. thank you and the hearing is adjourned. >> thank you. >> john brennan has the counterterrorism advisory for your years and now nominate background the president to be the c.i.a. director. we're wrapping up four hours of testimony. we're opening up the phone lines to find out about the issues discussed and
, to tunisia, from egypt to mali and others. while d.o.d. does not have primary responsibility for the security of u.s. diplomatic facilities around the world, we do work closely with the state department and support them as requested. in the months prior to the benghazi attack, as i've said, we had received from the intelligence community almost 300 reports on possible threats to american facilities around the world. over the course of the day on september 11, general dempsey and i received a number of reports of possible threats to u.s. facilities, including those in cairo, egypt, but there were no reports of imminent threats to u.s. personnel or facilities in benghazi. by our best estimate, the incident at the temporary mission facility in benghazi began at about 3:42 p.m. eastern daylight time on september 11. the embassy in tripoli was notified of the attacks almost immediately, and within 17 minutes of the initial reports, about 3:59 p.m., africom directed an unmanned, unmanned surveillance aircraft that was nearby to reposition overhead the benghazi facility. it was focused on the primar
of change in north africa and the middle east, some of those countries, such as egypt, libya and tunisia, are more susceptible to extremism and radicalisation. were these countries discussed and was any action proposed? >> i thank my honorable friend for his support. as i said earlier, there was a discussion specifically about mali, but there is more to be done to support democracy and the building blocks of democracy in countries such as egypt and libya. the eu, with its partnership and neighbourhood funds, has a role to play there. >> has my right honorable friend received an apology from the shadow chancellor, who, as we were reminded, said in the chamber last october that the government had failed to build the alliances needed to deliver a real-terms eu budget cut? >> i am not sure the shadow chancellor really does apologies, but it has been great to be cheered to the echo by him during today's statement. i will not expect it every time, but it has been a pleasure. >> as a business owner, when negotiating with suppliers i was always able to drive down costs when there was a clear alt
and for one-on-one talks concerning nuclear weapons. libya is obvious. a state ofgypt in unrest. now tunisia. we are probably in a more unsettled period since the end of the cold war and certainly i have ever seen. would you agree? >> i absolutely agree. >> meanwhile, the signal we are sending to the iranians is, don't worry. this aircraft carrier is not coming. this is really a disconnect the likes of which i have never seen before. i want to talk about the sequestration, because senator graham, senator a yacht -- ayotte travel around the country warning about the effects of sequestration. men and women of the military have said to us, how can we possibly do this, cause this uncertainty? the cancellation of the deployment of the aircraft carrier? the president of the united states said, it won't happen. during the campaign -- it won't happen. we were worried that it was going to happen. it is disgraceful to treat the men and women in the military so we all speak with such advocacy and passion on their behalf, to be subjected to this kind of day-to-day kind of uncertainty that they volunteer
or withdraw diplomatic staff in the advance of a crisis, from central america, from car whom, to tunisia, from egypt to mali and others. while d.o.d. does not have primary responsibility for the security of u.s. diplomatic facilities around the world, we do work closely with the state department and support them as requested. in the months prior to the benghazi attack, as i've said, we had received from the intelligence community almost 300 reports on possible threats to american facilities around the world. over the course of the day on september 11, general dempsey and i received a number of reports of possible threats to u.s. facilities, including those in cairo, egypt, but there were no reports of imminent threats to u.s. personnel or facilities in benghazi. my -- by our best estimate, the incident at the temporary mission facility in benghazi began at about 3:42 p.m. eastern daylight time on september 11. the embassy in tripoli was notified of the attacks almost immediately, and within 17 minutes of the initial reports, about 3:59 p.m., africom directed an unmanned, unmanned surveillance
there in the world and not all are benghazi or tripoli or tunisia. the reality is in most countries in the world we can rely on the host country to provide security. they are there and willing to do it and they do a good job. there are some of these embassies in some of these more volatile countries that are of concern and those are the 19 that were designated by the state department as ones we had to look at more closely and then try to develop a better approach to providing security, because there, part of the problem is the host countries are not very good in providing that kind of security. >> is there a -- it seems there is so much of a distance and time challenge that when it happens, how quickly can we respond, how far away are we. is there almost like a playbook for ambassadors for the people in those facilities that here's the steps to follow, jump on these immediately. if this doesn't click, we go to this, if this doesn't click, we go to that. >> the best playbook, the best playbook is an ambassador who says we've got serious security problems here. we are threatened and therefore we need
, now with tunisia, with libya, with all these countries, and certainly with mali, and how you plan to direct the agency to deal with this devolving momentum that is taking place in northern africa. so that will be for tuesday, and at the request of senator levin, i ask for unanimous consent to add into the record a joint statement that he and i made on april 27, 2012, and, secondly, in order to have mr. brennan's answers to questions for the record by the time he returns before us in closed session, i ask members provide questions fear for the record by 5:00 p.m. tomorrow. that is friday, february 8, so we have them for you as soon as possible. hot so you can respond to them tuesday. i want to thank you and your family for being here. and i wish you well. thank you, and the hearing is adjourned. >> taking madam chairman. -- thank you madam chairman. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> now live coverage as we go to the state department with the new secretary of state john kerry will speak and hold a join
libya, tunisia, and beyond. it is in our mutual interest. i want to thank the president for the important leadership. showing the support for libya. i think he and the people of the united kingdom can be proud. william and i agreed that the syrian people deserve better than the horrific violence that threatens the everyday lives of innocent people, people wanting their government to be accountable and part of their own lives. the regime has rained down rockets, and that is just the latest example of brutality. we condemn this indiscriminate killing of innocent civilians and we condemn it in the strongest terms. it is just further evidence assad has to go. i think william for the effort to help dial up the pressure on the regime, for their contributions of humanitarian aid and hosting the transition conference last month. let me make clear that we will continue to work closely with british allies to address the growing humanitarian crisis and the support of the syrian opposition council. we are coordinating with the syrian opposition coalition, coordinating with the un an
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)